News & Notices

Virginia Technical Institute Impacts Student's Lives

Monday, October 19, 2015

At our institute, it is our goal to educate and influence all lives, even those who don't necessarily come here to earn a trade. While some students attend our school to harness their skills for labor force jobs, some come to learn about using their hands and understand basic skills of using tools. Below is just one example of how Virginia Technical Institute is changing lives and giving people real-world skills to use for their future.

              "The reason I took CRFT 101 was because I had a mild interest in working with my hands. I knew I didn’t want to be a professional tradesman but I still wanted to be handy. I wanted to be able to look at a tool and be able to talk about what it is and how it works. I wanted to have a basic knowledge of electrical, carpentry, and plumbing.

              I learned quite a bit. I learned how to properly use power tools and what to use them for. I now know how to work safely and how important safety is to the job field. Mr. McClure taught us the importance of communication on a worksite and how to properly present you to a potential employer. I also learned more practical things like how to use a skill saw and how to properly hammer a nail. Working with the instructors at VTI was a great experience because they are all experts in their respective fields and if you take the time to listen you can learn something new every time one of them speaks.

              I plan to work for a theater company as a set builder and designer. I plan to take electrical 101 and carpentry 101 so I can have a good grasp on those skills. Set building and designing will be my day job and take care of my living expenses while I audition for shows in hopes of getting cast in a national tour. If I never get cast in a big show like a national tour I will be content working in and around a theater and working with my hands. I bet I’m the only person in my class who would love to be on Broadway. I think that this class will definitely give me a leg up in the theater world and will help me achieve my dreams. "

 

Virginia Technical Institute Featured in "Work it, Lynchburg"

Monday, April 29, 2013

Virginia Technial Institute was featured in a story titled "A 'weld' of opportunity" that ran in "Work It, Lynchburg."

Sparks are flying at Virginia Technical Institute, where Central Virginia Community College’s Fast Track Technical Training welding class is underway. Ten students meet six hours a day, four days a week at the Altavista trade school, learning the skills they’ll need to be entry-level professional welders.

Read the full article here

The Future of Technical Education

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

In the fall of 2011, Virginia Technical Institute (VTI) entered into a one-of-a-kind relationship with Liberty University (LU).  Recognizing the value of technical education, LU officials engaged with VTI to provide trade training to their four-year degree-seeking students.  Utilizing VTI’s state-of-the-art facilities and an internationally recognized curriculum from the National Center of Construction Education and Research (NCCER), LU began offering elective credit in the areas of Plumbing, Electrical, HVAC, Welding, and Carpentry.

The first cohort of 16 students ranged from art majors to industrial engineering majors.  This initial group of 16 grew to 127 students in just one semester.  Since the program inception, VTI has trained over 400 LU students using the NCCER curriculum.  Current classes include a unique blend of traditional VTI students, Liberty University students and craft professionals seeking a credential.

Liberty University’s respect for those professionals holding NCCER credentials is such that they now offer transfer credit for NCCER credentials.  Craft professionals who wish to pursue an undergraduate degree using LU’s convenient on-line delivery system may be given credit for NCCER credentials up to 31 credit hours.  Thanks to LU’s world-class online curriculum, those same professionals can earn their degree without ever leaving the jobsite.

Students participating in the program are in high demand from local industry.  VTI and LU placed several students in paid summer internships during the summer of 2012.  Each of these students was offered some level of continuing employment opportunity.  Participating companies included Georgia Pacific, Fleetwood-Goldco-Wyard, Southern-Air, and Moore’s Electric.

Four traits make the VTI program distinct. First, instructors emphasize a hands-on learning atmosphere where testing is treated as a learning opportunity and not simply an assessment procedure.  Second, by utilizing the curriculum developed by NCCER, students receive internationally recognized credentials ensuring their competiveness for craft jobs all over the globe.  Third, this all takes place in a state-of-the-art, 75,000 square foot facility.  Finally, students intensively train only in their intended craft.  There are no other educational distractions or demands.  Students have the ability to concentrate on training for their future career.   With plenty of space, real-world training equipment, and classroom emphasis on his/her area of training, most students are work-ready in less than a year.

Virginia Technical Institute’s mission is to meet the growing need of workforce training in Central and Southside Virginia.  VTI provides hands-on training in a variety of fields including Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC, Welding, Carpentry, and Industrial Maintenance.  VTI also offers contract training in the areas of Industrial Safety/OSHA Certification, and Leadership Development.

Virginia Technical Institute Announces Enrollment Milestone

Monday, January 21, 2013

Student enrollment at Virginia Technical Institute jumped from 176 in the Spring Semester of 2012 to 224 this semester—a 27% increase.  This brings total enrollment at VTI to 400 for the current academic year--a year-over-year increase of 44%.  According to Executive Director Keith Harkins, “students understand our most popular classes--welding, plumbing, electrical, and HVAC-- put them on a fast-track to employment. Industrial Maintenance has been a popular addition to our line-up as well.”   Much of the increase can be attributed to word-of-mouth recommendations from students.   Harkins also pointed out; “Our students serve as our greatest marketing tool.  If we provide them with quality training which leads to employment, they spread the word. Once students understand they will spend 100% of their time at VTI on their trade, they get it.  They understand how much more quickly they can learn a trade when it is the only class they have to take.”

In partnership with the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), VTI provides hands-on instruction in a 75,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility in Altavista.

Virginia Technical Institute Announces 2012 Graduating Class

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Today, VTI is proud to announce its inaugural graduating class.  Seventeen students will proudly complete their journey this semester in areas such as Welding, Plumbing, and HVAC.

Delegate Kathy Byron will give the inaugural commencement address during the ceremony to be held at VTI’s state-of-the-art facility in Altavista VA.

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